Tiptoeing Through the Politics of Evolution and Religion

Filed under: Belief, Evolutionary psychology, Faith, God, Group Selection

Note the blog’s new logo:  This blog is a response to this quotation: For centuries the writ of empiricism [science] has been spreading into the ancient domain of transcendentalist belief, slowly at the start but quickening in the scientific age. The spirits our ancestors knew intimately fled first the rocks and trees and then the …

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***”Our Two Minds, Emotions and Motivations in Human Evolution”*** The Book

Filed under: Author narrative, Dominance and Submission, Emotional Fossils, Evolution of Emotion, Evolutionary psychology, Group Selection, Language, Monogamy, Sexual Selection, Summary of Philosophy, The Ascension of the Human Spirit, The Deep Evolution of Emotion, Two Mind Hypothesis

This alternative view of human nature is a deeper, richer, and far more noble narrative of our exclusively human legacy: that of an indomitable spirit possessed of a will for justice and sustained through the millennia by the bounty that it fosters.

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Wallace’s Problem with Human Evolution

Filed under: Evolutionary psychology, Group Selection, Language, The Ascension of the Human Spirit

Linguist Steven Levinson criticizes evolutionary psychologist Michael Tomasello and linguist Derik Bickerson for being unable to shake loose of the “cold” abstract cognitive prerequisites rather than the “hot” motivational and interactive instincts that lie behind the universal patterns of multimodal communication.

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Freud and Darwin & Ontogeny and Phylogeny

Filed under: Dominance and Submission, Emotional Fossils, Evolution of Emotion, Evolutionary psychology, Group Selection

Ontology (the development of the individual) recapitulates phylogeny (the evolution of the species) is more applicable to the mind than the body. The process of identification in the oedipal complex is related to communication in early hominins.

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Group Selection: A brief history

Filed under: Group Selection | 1 Comment

There is very little argument that the reason that Homo sapiens has become the most dominant species on earth is our extraordinary ability to cooperate—I would say coordinate—in their behavior towards mutual goals. The issue addressed in this blog is how this came about. The demonstration by William Hamilton of “kin selection” in which the …

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